An Overview of New Hampshire’s Tax System

A look at some of the trends in tax collections over the past decade with a brief description of each of the state’s eight major sources of tax revenue — highlighting some of the characteristics that can help guide policymakers in devising a response to the fiscal challenges now before New Hampshire.

New Hampshire Health Protection Program

The New Hampshire Health Protection Program enables the state to leverage federal Medicaid dollars to expand access to affordable health insurance to low-income residents.

Strengthening New Hampshire’s Minimum Wage

Raising the minimum wage is one way New Hampshire can start to build an economy that works for everyone.

Business Taxes in New Hampshire: Where Do They Stand? How Much Do They Matter?

Some of the current proposals to reduce business taxes ignore facts about N.H.’s tax structure and, more generally, about the impact taxes have on economic activity. Here’s an overview to help put things in perspective.

Recent Publications:

New Hampshire’s Economy: Moving Forward, but Not Yet Running on All Cylinders

October 26, 2015 State Economy
Construction workers

One of the key issues debated throughout this year’s extended legislative session was the state of the New Hampshire economy and whether changes in business tax rates would help to foster future growth. While this issue dominated budget discussions, an examination of the true state of the economy often seemed missing. As this Issue Brief explains, on one hand, New Hampshire businesses are steadily producing more goods and services and hiring additional workers. At the same time, though, more and more of our fellow residents struggle to provide the basics for themselves, particularly households with children.

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New Hampshire’s Revenue Problem Persists; Business Tax Rate Reductions Would Impede Full Recovery

July 27, 2015 State Tax Policy
NH state quarters

New Hampshire’s ongoing budget debate hinges, in part, on current and future revenues, yet collections continue to fall short of pre-recession levels and appear unlikely to recover fully in the immediate future. Preliminary data from the Department of Administrative Services suggest that, while General and Education Fund revenue is poised to exceed initial expectations for fiscal year 2015, it will likely remain some $250 million less in FY 2015 than it was in FY 2008, after taking inflation into account. Furthermore, proposed reductions in the rates of the business profits and business enterprise taxes would help to perpetuate this revenue problem.

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The Conference Committee’s FY 2016-2017 Budget

June 23, 2015 State Budget
New Hampshire State House

In its particulars, the version of the FY 2016-2017 budget approved by the House and Senate conference committee on June 18 bears a strong resemblance to the tax and spending plan adopted by the upper chamber just a few weeks ago. While the conference agreement is intended to finance the operations of state government over the next two fiscal years, it is perhaps more notable for what it will do in the years after the close of the FY 2016-2017 biennium. The agreement includes a set of business tax cuts that, though they will reduce revenue by more than $20 million in the upcoming biennium, will not take full effect until FY 2020; once they do, they will drain more than $100 million out of each biennial budget.

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Common Cents Blog

Budgeting for a Better Tomorrow Today

16 Oct 2015

tree with coins

Given the amount of time required to reach a final agreement on New Hampshire’s budget this year, you could be excused for wanting to put off thoughts about appropriations, revenue projections, or surplus statements for a little while longer. In reality, though, it’s never too soon to consider ways to refine the process by which the Granite State sets its fiscal priorities, particularly since a pair of new Center on Budget and Policy Priorities reports suggest that there’s plenty of room for improvement.

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